Hendrick Hover

Pioneer Families of Northwestern New Jersey by William C. Armstrong Hendrick Hover – “In the year 1761 Hendrick Hover was living in Wallpack township, Sussex County, East Jersey. There is no reason to question the accuracy of that statement. But tradition in some lines of descent place the coming of the Hovers to Wallpack much earlier than 1761. Whence the Hovers came we know not; neither do we know the time. Hendrick Hover was of Dutch lineage but that does not imply that he was born in Holland and was an immigrant. He may have been born in New Jersey. Wallpack was in the beginning a Dutch settlement. This pioneer household consisted of Hendrick Hover, his wife whose name is not known, and their four grown-up children: John, Henry, Susannah and Emanuel. All these children were old enough to be helpful in pioneer days. John was 24 years old (estimated), Henry was 21, Susannah was 17 and Emanuel was 13. The older ones were beginning to think of establishing homes of their own; Susannah married within a year or two. Four children of Hendrick Hover: John, born about 1738, killed by the Indians in Pennsylvania, not married. Henry, born April 4, 1740, captain of militia during the Revolutionary War, married, descendants of his have for several generations dwelt at Huntsville, Logan Co., Ohio. Susannah, born 1744, died Nov 30, 1791, buried at Newton, N. J., married Captain Henry Johnson, their descendants have been prominent in Northern New Jersey. Emanuel, born 1748, captured by the indians at the time when his brother was killed, but he returned home. He married in...

James S. McDonolds

Biographical Encyclopedia: Successful Men of New Jersey Frederick W. Ricord, Librarian of the New Jersey Historical Society Editor-in-Chief Volume 1 New York New Jersey Historical Publishing Co., 1896 James S. McDonolds was born July 11th, 1841, in Branchville, Sussex Co. His parents were Henry and Catherine (Stivers) McDonolds, of Branchville. He attended the common schools of his native town, and was graduated from Allen’s Private School at Howard, Pa., after which he removed for a short time to Horseheads, N. Y. When scarcely twenty years old he enlisted as a private in the Seventh New Jersey Volunteer Infantry, and went to the front. In a very short time he proved himself to be in all respects a brave soldier, and, after a year’s service in the ranks, he was commissioned as Second Lieutenant of Company D, Fifteenth New Jersey Volunteers. In March, 1863, he was again promoted to the First Lieutenancy of Company H, of the same regiment. This position he held until 1864, when, for bravery on the field and efficient service as an officer, he was made Captain and placed in command of Company B, of his old regiment. This position he retained, doing good service for his country, until May 12th, 1864, when, at the battle of Spottsylvania, he was wounded in both legs and was also shot through the chin, the bullet carrying away the lower part of his jaw. It became necessary to amputate his right leg, and the shock of the operation, in the feeble condition in which he had been left by his recent exertions in battle, rendered his hope of escaping...

Henry Wilson Merriam

Biographical Encyclopedia: Successful Men of New Jersey Frederick W. Ricord, Librarian of the New Jersey Historical Society Editor-in-Chief Volume 1, Page 47, New York New Jersey Historical Publishing Co., 1896 Henry Wilson Merriam, manufacturer, son of Elisha Jones and Lucy Rebecca (Lane) Merriam, of Merriam Hill, Mason, New Hampshire, was born June 20th, 1828. The foundation of his education was laid in the common schools of his native town, but while yet a boy he attended the public schools of North Brookfield and Worcester, Mass., and his studies were completed at Appleton Academy, New Ipswich. When sixteen years of age he removed to Worcester, Mass., where he reside until he attained his majority, when he located in New York City. From 1851 until 1861 young Merriam was in the boot and shoe jobbing business in New York City (associated with J. T. Patten and John J. Lane), which had been successful, but owing to the conditions brought about by the war, the firm was dissolved, and Merriam soon commenced the manufacture of shoes for the army, and during the war period manufactured for and disposed of to the Govermnetnt a large quantity of those goods. After the close of the war Mr. Merriam turned the product of his factory to that of shoes for ladies, misses and children, producing for a period more than half a million pairs annually, which were distributed by jobbers in New York and other large cities. His business had grown to such large proportions, and had become so sucessful, that in 1873 he was prompted to move his plant to Newton, N. J., where...

George Henry Nichols

Biographical History of Central Kansas Lewis Publishing Company | 1902 | Volume 1, pg. 532 For many years, in fact from the early days of development in Rice county, farming has been the leading occupation of the people, and for almost a quarter of a century Mr. Nichols has been a representative of this branch of industry in central Kansas. He located here in 1878 and has performed the arduous task of transforming wild prairie into richly cultivated fields. He comes from the far-off state of New Jersey, his birth having there occurred in the town of Sparta, on the 20th of July, 1855. His father, Ziba Nichols, was a well-known citizen of Wilson township, Rice county, for a number of years, becoming a pioneer settler here. He was born in New Jersey and was of Scottish lineage. His childhood days were spent in the state of his nativity and his education was acquired in the public schools. He married Matilda Smith, also a native of that state, reared and educated there. In 1858, he removed with his family to Henry county, Illinois, locating near Kewanee, where he resided until 1881, the year of his arrival in Rice county, Kansas. Here he spent his remaining days, his death occurring in Wilson township, in August, 1887, when he was sixty-five years of age. His wife died in February, 1888, at the age of sixty-seven. In politics, he was a Republican, and in religious faith Mrs. Nichols was identified with the Presbyterian church. They had ten children, namely: Wesley, who was a soldier of Company H, Ninth Illinois Cavalry, and served for four years,...

Dr. Joseph H. Nichols

Biography from Stark County, IL History by M.A. Leeson |  1887 Dr. J.H. Nichols, physician and surgeon, was born in New Jersey, December 18, 1818. His parents were Zaba (sic) and Margaret (Smith) Nichols, natives of New Jersey. The doctor received the rudiments of an education at home, the practical part of which was acquired on the farm. When a lad, he entered commercial life in the village of Sparta, N.Y.* In 1839, he moved to Connersville, Ind., came to Lafayette, Ill., in 1840; subsequently studied literature at Tolsbury college, next taught school at Rising Sun, W. Tenn., and studied medicine under Dr. Lamb, until he entered the Ohio Medical College in 1843. In the winter of 1844-5 he graduated from this institution, and in the spring of 1850 located permanently at Lafayette. In those years he was called to attend the sick and wounded over a large area — duties generally attended with dangers, difficulties and privations. The horse and saddle formed the locomotive of this olden time — a monotonous, slow means of travel, but the best means which the military tract then assumed to be practicable. Notwithstanding those years of labor and hardships the doctor is still sound in mind and body, giving promise of holding his place among the pioneer physicians of Central Illinois for years to come; though now retired from active professional work. He was married at Connersville, Ind. to Miss Louisa Woodcock in 1848. Their children are Luella Butler, wife of G. H. Butler, of Iliff, Col., and Albert H. Nichols. His wife died in 1874, in communion with the Congregational church. In 1881...

Albert Robbins

Northwestern New Jersey, A History: Somerset, Morris, Hunterdon, Warren and Sussex Counties by A. Van Doren Honeyman | Vol. IV ( 1927) ALFRED ROBBINS – Few of the citizens of Middleville, Sussex County, New Jersey, are better known than is Alfred Robbins, proprietor of the general store in Middleville, which is conducted under the name of A. Robbins and Son. Previous to the time of his purchase of the general store Mr. Robbins was for some fifty years a first class carpenter, and was known for his excellent work and for his sound business methods. The Robbins family has been resident in Sussex County since pre-Revolutionary days, and the great-grandfather of Mr. Robbins served in that conflict. Charl es Robbins, the grandfather, was a resident of Frankford Township, Sussex County, where he was employed at various kindsss of work by the day. He died in Sandyston at the age of ninety-four years, having survived his wife Hannah (Spangenberg) Robbins. They were the parents of children: Stephen; Dillie Ryker; Jane Transue; Sarah Kays; John; Joseph; and Patrick. Patrick Robbins, son of Charles and Hannah (Spangenberg) Robbins, was born in Frankford Township and received his education in the public schools of his native district. He was engaged in farming in Hampton Township throughout his active career and spent his last years with his son, Alfred, in Stillwater Township, where he died at the age of eighty-seven years. He married Nancy Staley, a daughter of Philip Staley, and they were the parents of one child, Alfred Robbins, of whom further. Alfred Robbins, son of Patrick and Nancy (Staley) Robbins, was born in Hampton Township, Sussex...